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28. What if I am receiving benefits from the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP)?

The FEHBP is creditable coverage, which means it is at least as good as Medicare’s. Unless you are eligible for the low-income subsidy under Part D, it is unlikely that you will find a plan that is as comprehensive as FEHBP, so you will probably not want to switch plans. If you decide to enroll in Part D later, you will not pay a late enrollment penalty as long as you enroll within 63 days of dropping or losing your FEHBP coverage. If you are eligible for Extra Help, you will need to compare the available plans carefully. While your copayments may be less under Part D, the list of drugs covered under FEHBP may be broader than those under the Medicare plans in your area. Remember, if you are an annuitant and you terminate your FEHBP coverage, you will not be allowed to re-enroll in any FEHBP plan if you later change your mind.



   

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